The decline of the weekly food shop

Communities once bemoaned the decline of local shops, which were abandoned in favour of the supermarket giants and a convenient once-a-week shop. Here you could buy everything necessary to feed a family for an entire week, and more besides, all under one roof.

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It seems, however, that the tide is turning again, with consumers voting firmly with their feet and returning to smaller shops and farmers’ markets for fresh, local produce. They are using the supermarket as a convenience store, popping in for select items as and when needed. It seems that people are not put off by paying slightly more money for using local shops. This could be down to the fact that there is a desire amongst many people to want healthy food and drink and therefore want it fresh. This attitude seems to be shared with people who prepare food as part of their job. For example, a house keeper may be keen on preparing fresh food for the family that they work for to ensure that the children especially are eating enough healthy food. Having a housekeeper like this can reduce the burden for busy parents who work a lot with trying to give their children the best diet possible. If you are interested and  looking for a London Housekeeper agency, then look no further than https://www.littleoneslondon.co.uk/housekeepers

Shopping around for a bargain

As household budgets feel the pinch, the trend appears to reflect shoppers’ desire to waste less and buy only what is necessary. Shoppers are becoming wiser in their search for a bargain and will quite literally shop around for the best deal, often visiting three or four different supermarkets at a time to save money.

Research published in the Waitrose Food and Drink Report 2017 found that 75 per cent of Britons visit the supermarket more than once a day, with fewer large trolleys used on a daily basis; instead, shoppers use baskets or shallow ‘daily shopper’ trolleys.

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Changing tastes

The financial crash was the catalyst for this change in our shopping habits, but one we are apparently happy to stick with. Although this may not be great news for the country’s supermarkets, many other businesses are capitalising.

Local farmers, artisan foods and specialist products are all experiencing an upsurge in popularity, while companies that supply refrigerated display counters to supermarkets and smaller outlets.
They have always been a popular choice for busy workers wanting to grab a sandwich or snack, but now health conscious eaters are getting in on the act. One of this years’ top food trends is the ‘buddha bowl’, which is a healthy balance of vegetables, grains and protein packed full of nutrients. A refrigerated food counter is now the perfect place to turn to for a quick, healthy meal on the go.

As consumers, we are demanding more than ever before. We want less waste, better value and more choice. With the change in our shopping habits here to stay, the challenge for the supermarkets is how to keep up.